Sengers syndrome

Contact us
 
Return to database


We were unfortunately unable to download the information for this disease from OMIM.



Prevalence of clinical parameters (%)







Add new symptom/sign to this disease

Select symptom from list or write it in the box
Pubmed id number as a reference Organ system affected
Number of patients in the reference Percent affected patients (Between 0 and 1, eg. 0.1 = 10%)
Please provide your name and contact information as a reference
Name Institute Phone number Email address


List of symptoms



Symptom/sign Organ system Percent affected Pubmed id Added on(yyyy-mm-dd) Edit/add reference
Lactate accumulation circulatory 100 % 15168109 2011-10-18
Cardiomyopathy circulatory 100 % 16736096 2011-10-11
Cataract nervous 100 % 16736096 2011-10-11
Exercise intolerance multi 100 % 15168109 2011-10-11
Cataract nervous 100 % 15168109 2011-10-11
Hypotonia skeletal 100 % 16736096 2011-10-10
Myopathy skeletal 100 % 15168109 2011-10-11
Cardiomyopathy circulatory 100 % 15168109 2011-10-11
3-methylglutaconic aciduria multi 50 % 15168109 2011-10-10
Hypotonia skeletal 50 % 15168109 2011-10-10



List of references:


Congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cataract, mitochondrial myopathy and defective oxidative phosphorylation in two siblings with Sengers-like syndrome.
Eva Morava, Rob Sengers, Henk Ter Laak, Lambert Van Den Heuvel, Antoon Janssen, Frans Trijbels, Hans Cruysberg, Carolien Boelen, Jan Smeitink,

We describe two siblings with a Sengers-like syndrome, who presented with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, infantile cataract, mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and normal mental development. A mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) defect was detected since the ANT1 protein was not detectable by immmunoblotting in muscle samples of the patients. Additionally to these features of classical Sengers syndrome (OMIM 212350), we found that the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, measured by biochemical analysis, was severely compromised in skeletal muscle in both children. Biochemical and morphological analysis of the fibroblasts revealed normal results. The association of significantly decreased pyruvate oxidation rates, deficient energy production and decreased multiple mitochondrial enzyme-complex activities in the muscle samples of our patients is a new finding which differs from previous results in patients with Sengers syndrome.

European journal of pediatrics - Aug 2004



Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cataract, developmental delay, lactic acidosis: a novel subtype of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.
Gabriella Di Rosa, Federica Deodato, Ference J Loupatty, Cristiano Rizzo, Rosalba Carrozzo, Filippo M Santorelli, Sara Boenzi, Adele D'Amico, Giulia Tozzi, Enrico Bertini, Andrea Maiorana, Ronald J A Wanders, Carlo Dionisi-Vici,

3-Methylglutaconic aciduria is the biochemical marker of several inherited metabolic diseases. Four types of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria can be distinguished. In the type I form, accumulation of 3-methylglutaconate is due to deficient activity of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase, an enzyme of the leucine degradation pathway. In the other forms, 3-methylglutaconic acid is not derived from leucine but is of unidentified origin, possibly derived from other metabolic pathways, such as mevalonate metabolism. We report five patients, all presenting a severe early-onset phenotype characterized by 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cataract, hypotonia/developmental delay, lactic acidosis, and normal 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase activity. This peculiar phenotype, for which a primary mitochondrial disorder is hypothesized, identifies a novel subtype of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria.

Journal of inherited metabolic disease - Aug 2006