Severe combined immunodeficiency, X-linked
SCID X linked

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Prevalence of clinical parameters (%)







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Pubmed id number as a reference Organ system affected
Number of patients in the reference Percent affected patients (Between 0 and 1, eg. 0.1 = 10%)
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List of symptoms



Symptom/sign Organ system Percent affected Pubmed id Added on(yyyy-mm-dd) Edit/add reference
Recurrent infections multi 100 % 22105576 2012-01-18
Recurrent infections multi 94 % 8185357 2012-01-18
Lymphopenia lymphatic 91 % 22105576 2012-01-18
T-cell reduction lymphatic 91 % 22105576 2012-01-18
Failure to thrive multi 88 % 8185357 2012-01-18
NK-cell reduction lymphatic 82 % 22105576 2012-01-18
Vomiting digestive 81 % 8185357 2012-01-18
Candidiasis multi 47 % 8185357 2012-01-18



List of references:


Clinical characteristics and mutation analysis of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency in China.
Cui Zhang, Zhi-Yong Zhang, Jun-Feng Wu, Xue-Mei Tang, Xi-Qiang Yang, Li-Ping Jiang, Xiao-Dong Zhao,

X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) is a rare, life-threatening immune disorder, caused by mutations of the gene for the γ-chain (γc) of the interleukin-2 receptor, IL2RG. We analyzed the clinical, immunologic, and molecular characteristics of children with X-SCID, attempting to improve the diagnosis and treatment of X-SCID in China.

World journal of pediatrics : WJP - Feb 2013



Early diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome.
R A Hague, S Rassam, G Morgan, A J Cant,

Infants with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCIDS) have a greatly improved prognosis if diagnosed and treated before they develop overwhelming infection. Clinical and laboratory data on 45 patients with SCIDS were retrospectively reviewed to assess the value of absolute lymphocyte counts in making an early diagnosis. Ninety infants matched for age, sex, and presenting symptoms were used as controls. Thirteen (29%) infants with SCIDS were diagnosed at birth as previous siblings had been affected; 32 (71%) were diagnosed after the development of symptoms. Eighteen (56%) of these remained undiagnosed until after 6 months of age. The first symptoms occurred at a median of 5 weeks (range 1 day to 8 months) and the first admission to hospital was at 4 months (range 1 week to 16 months). Symptoms included respiratory infection (91%), vomiting and diarrhoea (81%), failure to thrive (88%), candidiasis (50%), and skin lesions (28%). The mean lymphocyte count was 1.71 x 10(9)/l compared with 7.2 x 10(9)/l in controls. Excluding one child with Omenn's syndrome (lymphocyte count 23.3 x 10(9)/l, all symptomatic infants with SCIDS had lymphocyte counts less than 2.8 x 10(9)/l at presentation. The median delay between the first abnormal lymphocyte count and diagnosis was seven weeks (range one day to 13 months). Twenty eight (88%) of 32 infants would have been diagnosed before 6 months of age if investigated after the first low lymphocyte count. These data indicate that low lymphocyte counts are predictive of SCIDS. Paediatricians are urged to pay attention to the absolute lymphocyte counts in all infants in whom a full blood count is performed. Those with lymphocyte counts persistently less than 2.8 x 10(9)l should be investigated for SCIDS.

Archives of disease in childhood - Apr 1994