Spastic paraplegia 7
SPG7

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Description from OMIM

Hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG) is characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs due to degeneration of corticospinal axons. There is considerable genetic heterogeneity. Inheritance is most often autosomal dominant (see 182600), but X-linked (see 312920) and autosomal recessive (see 270800) forms occur. SPG7 shows phenotypic variability between families. Some cases are pure, whereas other are complicated with additional neurologic features (Warnecke et al., 2007).



Prevalence of clinical parameters (%)







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List of symptoms



Symptom/sign Organ system Percent affected Pubmed id Added on(yyyy-mm-dd) Edit/add reference
Spasticity nervous 100 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Hyperactive reflexes nervous 95 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Babinski's sign nervous 95 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Optic atrophy nervous 60 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Pallesthesia nervous 48 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Cerebellar atrophy nervous 47 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Muscle weakness skeletal 39 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Ataxia nervous 23 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Dysarthria nervous 23 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Hypometric saccades nervous 20 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Muscle atrophy skeletal 17 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Neuropathy nervous 14 % 23065789 2014-07-25
Nystagmus nervous 8 % 23065789 2014-07-25



List of references:


Spastic paraplegia gene 7 in patients with spasticity and/or optic neuropathy.
Stephan Klebe, Christel Depienne, Sylvie Gerber, Georges Challe, Mathieu Anheim, Perrine Charles, Estelle Fedirko, Elodie Lejeune, Julien Cottineau, Alfredo Brusco, Hélène Dollfus, Patrick F Chinnery, Cecilia Mancini, Xavier Ferrer, Guilhem Sole, Alain Destée, Jean-Michel Mayer, Bertrand Fontaine, Jérôme de Seze, Michel Clanet, Elisabeth Ollagnon, Philippe Busson, Cécile Cazeneuve, Giovanni Stevanin, Josseline Kaplan, Jean-Michel Rozet, Alexis Brice, Alexandra Durr,

Mutations in the spastic paraplegia 7 (SPG7) gene encoding paraplegin are responsible for autosomal recessive hereditary spasticity. We screened 135 unrelated index cases, selected in five different settings: SPG7-positive patients detected during SPG31 analysis using SPG31/SPG7 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (n = 7); previously reported ambiguous SPG7 cases (n = 5); patients carefully selected on the basis of their phenotype (spasticity of the lower limbs with cerebellar signs and/or cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging/computer tomography scan and/or optic neuropathy and without other signs) (n = 24); patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis referred consecutively from attending neurologists and the national reference centre in a diagnostic setting (n = 98); and the index case of a four-generation family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy but no spasticity linked to the SPG7 locus. We identified two SPG7 mutations in 23/134 spastic patients, 21% of the patients selected according to phenotype but only 8% of those referred directly. Our results confirm the pathogenicity of Ala510Val, which was the most frequent mutation in our series (65%) and segregated at the homozygous state with spastic paraparesis in a large family with autosomal recessive inheritance. All SPG7-positive patients tested had optic neuropathy or abnormalities revealed by optical coherence tomography, indicating that abnormalities in optical coherence tomography could be a clinical biomarker for SPG7 testing. In addition, the presence of late-onset very slowly progressive spastic gait (median age 39 years, range 18-52 years) associated with cerebellar ataxia (39%) or cerebellar atrophy (47%) constitute, with abnormal optical coherence tomography, key features pointing towards SPG7-testing. Interestingly, three relatives of patients with heterozygote SPG7 mutations had cerebellar signs and atrophy, or peripheral neuropathy, but no spasticity of the lower limbs, suggesting that SPG7 mutations at the heterozygous state might predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, mimicking autosomal dominant inheritance. Finally, a novel missense SPG7 mutation at the heterozygous state (Asp411Ala) was identified as the cause of autosomal dominant optic neuropathy in a large family, indicating that some SPG7 mutations can occasionally be dominantly inherited and be an uncommon cause of isolated optic neuropathy. Altogether, these results emphasize the clinical variability associated with SPG7 mutations, ranging from optic neuropathy to spastic paraplegia, and support the view that SPG7 screening should be carried out in both conditions.

Brain : a journal of neurology - Oct 2012